VELscope®

VELscope® technology is changing the way oral mucosal examinations take place. The VELscope® handheld device emits a harmless, bright blue light which is used to inspect the mouth and tongue. The device is sensitive to abnormal tissue changes and the distinctive blue-spectrum light causes the soft tissue (oral mucosa) of the mouth to naturally fluoresce. Healthy tissues fluoresce in distinct patterns that may be visibly disrupted when tissue undergoes an abnormal change (which can occur in the oral mucosa for a multitude of reasons,) such as when associated with dysplasia or oral cancer.*

Early detection of oral cancer offers the best chance of survival. Studies have shown that only half of all patients diagnosed with oral cancer survive more than five years.

Oral cancer often starts as a tiny, unnoticed white or red spot or sore anywhere in the mouth. During oral cancer screening, we carefully examine the inside of your mouth and tongue for a flat, painless, white or red spot or a small sore. Although most of these are harmless, some are not. To ensure that a spot or sore is not dangerous, we may perform a simple test, such as a brush test, to collect cells from your mouth for laboratory analysis. If precancerous cells are found, the lesion can be surgically removed.

What Are The Symptoms Of Oral Cancer?

  • A sore that bleeds easily or does not heal
  • A color change of your gums
  • A lump, thickening, rough spot, crust or small eroded area
  • Pain, tenderness, or numbness anywhere in the mouth or on the lips
  • Difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking or moving the jaw or tongue
  • A change in the way the teeth fit together

Risk factors:

  • Tobacco use
  • Alcohol use combined with smoking
  • Prolonged exposure to the sun (lip cancer)
  • If you are over the age of 40

Preventative measures:

  • Reduce or stop tobacco use
  • Reduce or stop alcohol use, especially if combined with smoking
  • Reduce sun exposure, or use a high SPF sunscreen
  • Have a diet high in fruits and vegetables

You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to your exam. You may be given a gown to wear during the procedure.
Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and should be left at home or removed prior to your exam. You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. You may be asked to remove any piercings, if possible.
Cone beam CT is not the same as conventional CT. However, dental cone beam CT can be used to produce images that are similar to those produced by conventional CT imaging.
With cone beam CT, an x-ray beam in the shape of a cone is moved around the patient to produce a large number of images, also called views. CT scans and cone beam CT both produce high-quality images. Dental cone beam CT was developed as a means of producing similar types of images but with a much smaller and less expensive machine that could be placed in an outpatient office.
Cone beam CT provides detailed images of the bone and is performed to evaluate diseases of the jaw, dentition, bony structures of the face, nasal cavity and sinuses. It has the advantage of lower radiation exposure compared to conventional CT.

What are some common uses of the procedure?

Dental cone beam CT is commonly used for treatment planning of orthodontic issues. It is also useful for more complex cases that involve:

  • surgical planning for impacted teeth.
  • diagnosing temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ).
  • accurate placement of dental implants.
  • evaluation of the jaw, sinuses, nerve canals and nasal cavity.
  • detecting, measuring and treating jaw tumors.
  • determining bone structure and tooth orientation.
  • locating the origin of pain or pathology.
  • cephalometric analysis.
  • reconstructive surgery.*

* from radiologyinfo.org

Early detection of oral cancer offers the best chance of survival. Studies have shown that only half of all patients diagnosed with oral cancer survive more than five years.
Oral cancer often starts as a tiny, unnoticed white or red spot or sore anywhere in the mouth. During oral cancer screening, we carefully examine the inside of your mouth and tongue for a flat, painless, white or red spot or a small sore. Although most of these are harmless, some are not. To ensure that a spot or sore is not dangerous, we may perform a simple test, such as a brush test, to collect cells from your mouth for laboratory analysis. If precancerous cells are found, the lesion can be surgically removed.

What Are The Symptoms Of Oral Cancer?

  • A sore that bleeds easily or does not heal
  • A color change of your gums
  • A lump, thickening, rough spot, crust or small eroded area
  • Pain, tenderness, or numbness anywhere in the mouth or on the lips
  • Difficulty chewing, swallowing, speaking or moving the jaw or tongue
  • A change in the way the teeth fit together

Risk factors:

Tobacco use
Alcohol use combined with smoking
Prolonged exposure to the sun (lip cancer)
If you are over the age of 40

Preventative measures:

Reduce or stop tobacco use
Reduce or stop alcohol use, especially if combined with smoking
Reduce sun exposure, or use a high SPF sunscreen
Have a diet high in fruits and vegetables

*ledapteryx.com